Monday, September 24, 2018

Review: Speaking (and Signing) of Job, in ‘I Was Most Alive With You’ by Jesse Green

Craig Lucas’s play — about deafness, gayness, addiction, disease, faith and philosophy — puts a modern family to the test.

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Sunday, September 23, 2018

Review: A Slain Journalist’s Voice Resounds in ‘Intractable Woman’ by Ben Brantley

Stefano Massini’s poetically cadenced portrait of the life and death of the Russian journalist Anna Politkovskaya lets facts speak for themselves.

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Review: An Autumnal Patti Smith Remembers Summer in ‘Words and Music’ by Ben Brantley

In a piece she describes as “sort of a play,” the poet and singer journeys through her past, with a little help from her children.

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Friday, September 21, 2018

Tennessee Williams Made Paintings. They Were About Love and Loss, Too. by Michael Adno

The playwright’s little-known artworks provide an intimate look at his preoccupation with eternal questions and his feeling of being an outsider.

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‘A Little Life’ Comes to the Stage. The Audience Can’t Look Away. by Nina Siegal

Hanya Yanagihara’s best-selling novel includes many disturbing scenes. In a new production in Amsterdam, the director Ivo van Hove puts that cruelty center stage.

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Thursday, September 20, 2018

Review: In ‘The True,’ Edie Falco Stars as the Soul of an Old Machine by Jesse Green

Albany politics in 1977 may not seem very scintillating. But Ms. Falco brings out the buried drama of an ambitious woman in a man’s political world.

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This Season’s Most Produced Play: ‘A Doll’s House, Part 2’ by Peter Libbey

Lucas Hnath’s Ibsen sequel will be seen at 27 theaters, and work by women is dramatically represented on American Theater magazine’s annual tally.

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Micheline Rozan, a Force Behind a Theater Master, Dies at 89 by Neil Genzlinger

She helped the famed director Peter Brook start an influential theater group in Paris and mount major productions like “The Mahabharata.”

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Annette Bening and Tracy Letts to Star in ‘All My Sons’ on Broadway by Michael Paulson

Arthur Miller’s tragic World War II drama is to return to Broadway next spring via the Roundabout Theater Company.

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Review: Up All Night, With Rebecca Hall as Muse, in ‘Soundstage’ by Elisabeth Vincentelli

Rob Roth’s new multimedia show uses video to try to capture the relationship between an obsessive fan and the actress who’s the object of his fantasies.

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Stephen Jeffreys, Author of the Play ‘The Libertine,’ Dies at 68 by Neil Genzlinger

He also had a keen eye for undiscovered talent, helping along numerous careers as a reader of new works at the Royal Court Theater in London.

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‘Who Will Remember Her, Once She is Buried?’ by Peter Libbey

In plays like “Intractable Woman,” about a murdered investigative journalist, Stefano Massini seeks to create a “biopsy of reality.”

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What if the Guy With the Red Pencil Is Nuts? by Amos Barshad

Bobby Cannavale is a showy journalist, Daniel Radcliffe a stickler for the truth. In “The Lifespan of a Fact,” their face-off takes on epic proportions.

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They Write Darn Good Plays. They Direct Them, Too. by A.j. Goldmann

A crop of new works written by their directors — or maybe directed by their playwrights — is lighting up stages in Berlin and Frankfurt at the beginning of the theater season.

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Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Review: In ‘The Revolving Cycles,’ What Happened to Terrell? by Jesse Green

A woman hunts for her former foster brother. Was he, like so many young black men, a victim of drugs or police or violence? Or did he just disappear?

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A Dance World Mystery Spurs a Contest for Choreographers by Roslyn Sulcas

What’s inside Agnes de Mille’s unopened 1963 letter? Rather than peeking, an organization is commissioning new work in her honor.

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Royal Opera House Gets a $66 Million Revamp by Alex Marshall

The almost-three-year renovation includes the 406-seat Linbury Theater, and more public spaces in the foyer.

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Tuesday, September 18, 2018

An Experimental Troupe Can Unpack Its Bags by Jose SolÍs

Theater Mitu inaugurates a new home in Gowanus, Brooklyn, with a multimedia piece called “Remnant.”

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Monday, September 17, 2018

Review: A One-Man Funeral With Many Lives in ‘I Hear You and Rejoice’ by Ben Brantley

Mikel Murfi’s virtuoso performance about the life and death of a redoubtable woman is a many-tongued wonder of Irish storytelling.

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Sunday, September 16, 2018

Review: In ‘The Emperor,’ Apologizing for a Corrupt Regime by Jesse Green

The shape-shifting Kathryn Hunter plays 11 members of the court of Haile Selassie in Ethiopia, witnessing and regretting the revolution.

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Review: Listening to ‘Uncle Vanya’ With Virgin Ears by Ben Brantley

Richard Nelson’s emotionally transparent interpretation of a Chekhov masterwork, starring a brilliant Jay O. Sanders, makes us hear a classic anew.

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Review: ‘The Arts’ Makes a Wonky Case for the N.E.A. by Laura Collins-Hughes

This experimental docudrama at La MaMa charts the history of the National Endowment for the Arts and argues for its continued importance.

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After 25 Years, the Curtain Closes on ‘Theater Talk’ by Andrew R. Chow

Over the years, the show included interviews with James Gandolfini, Cate Blanchett, Idina Menzel and Hugh Jackman.

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Friday, September 14, 2018

Peter Donat, Actor Who Played a Panoply of Roles, Dead at 90 by Richard Sandomir

Mr. Donat acted often on the screen and had a recurring role on “The X Files.” But he said he was most gratified by theatrical work.

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Critic’s Notebook: A Chorus Remembers Michael Brown in ‘Antigone in Ferguson’ by Ben Brantley

This combination of a classical tragedy and a contemporary discussion group finds a mirror for Ferguson, Mo., in ancient Thebes.

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A Word With: Why William Jackson Harper of ‘The Good Place’ Can’t Quit the Theater by Alexis Soloski

Mr. Harper, best known for his sitcom role, is making his debut as a playwright.

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The Shows I’m Afraid to Look Forward To by Jesse Green

Sometimes what you think you won’t like is what you love most.

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London Theater Reviews: Women Push the Envelope, in Different Ways by Matt Wolf

Alexis Zegerman’s “Holy __” is a lively, if overheated, cautionary tale; while Clare Barron’s “Dance Nation” looks at troubles that come from within.

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A Playwright and a Songwriter, Finding the Right Words by Jane Gordon Julien

Emily Kaczmarek and Zoe Sarnak began a collaboration that created the musical, “Afterwords,” and a place for each other in their hearts.

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Thursday, September 13, 2018

Review: In ‘Agnes,’ Familial Ties Bound So Tightly They Fray by Laura Collins-Hughes

In Catya McMullen’s tender and funny play, a brother with Asperger’s syndrome seeks connection as his overprotective sister’s relationship flounders.

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How Next Wave Is It? Joseph V. Melillo Picks His Kind of Show From His Final Program by Peter Libbey

From circus to Sophocles, the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s executive producer leaves his mark.

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