Thursday, February 20, 2020

Broadway’s ‘The Inheritance’ to Close on March 15 by Michael Paulson

Acclaimed in London, the two-part play about gay culture and the legacy of AIDS drew a chillier response in New York, where it is set.

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‘West Side Story’ Review: Sharks vs. Jets vs. Video by Ben Brantley

Ivo van Hove’s attention-splintering revival of the immortal 1957 musical features new choreography, a ravishing orchestra and smothering visual effects.

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‘Mack & Mabel’ Review: Lights! Camera! Passion! by Laura Collins-Hughes

Jerry Herman’s buoyant score is the highlight of this Encores! production about a troubled silent-movie-era romance.

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Star Directors Pull Back the Curtain on How They Work by Laura Cappelle

Peter Brook and Thomas Ostermeier are presenting unfinished shows in Paris, offering a rare chance to see how their productions come together.

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Wednesday, February 19, 2020

The Prophecies of Beckett and Caryl Churchill Haunt London’s Stages by Ben Brantley

Compelling revivals make “Endgame” (with Alan Cumming and Daniel Radcliffe) and “Far Away” feel more unsettlingly relevant than ever.

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‘West Side Story’ Stalemate: Bernardo’s Staying. So Are Protesters. by Julia Jacobs

What is the proper punishment for #MeToo-era infractions? Demonstrators have been calling for Amar Ramasar’s removal from the cast because of his role in a photo-sharing scandal at City Ba…

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Why Tales of Female Trios Are Newly Relevant by Megan O’grady

In literature and pop culture, women often come in threes, deriving power from solidarity even as they work to forge their own paths.

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Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Review: In ‘Anatomy of a Suicide,’ Pain in Triplicate by Alexis Soloski

Alice Birch’s cleareyed and comfortless play follows three generations of women tethered to life by the thinnest possible filament.

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Zoe Caldwell, Winner of Four Tony Awards, Is Dead at 86 by Neil Genzlinger

Her signature performances included the title role in “The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie” and Maria Callas in “Master Class.”

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In ‘Coal Country,’ Memories From a Mining Tragedy Live On by Julia Jacobs

A new documentary play at the Public Theater weaves together interviews from people whose lives were forever changed by the 2010 mining disaster in West Virginia.

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‘Spamtown, USA’ Looks at a Bitter Strike Through Children’s Eyes by Laura Collins-Hughes

Minnesota’s Children’s Theater Company will present a play inspired by little-told stories of the wrenching Hormel strike: from kids on all sides of the dispute.

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‘Where We Stand’ Review: Gifts are Given, but at What Cost? by Maya Phillips

Donnetta Lavinia Grays is winningly uninhibited in her fable-like solo show about a community seduced by a mysterious benefactor.

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A Hometown Exhibition Will Showcase August Wilson’s Process by Peter Libbey

The show will open in the late fall at the August Wilson African American Cultural Center in downtown Pittsburgh.

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Monday, February 17, 2020

Review: ‘Dracula’ and ‘Frankenstein’? Nothing to Be Scared Of by Alexis Soloski

Classic Stage Company is running adaptations of two 19th-century horror classics in repertory. Don’t let that frighten you.

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No Room Service, but History’s on the Menu by Jordan Levin

An immersive theater project in a dilapidated hotel aims to reanimate a Miami neighborhood’s past. It’s popular, but is it sanitizing gentrification?

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Sunday, February 16, 2020

The Newest Iteration of a Bob Marley Musical by Devi Lockwood

“Get Up, Stand Up! The Bob Marley Story” will premiere at the Lyric Theatre in London’s West End next year.

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David Byrne’s ‘American Utopia’ Will Return to Broadway Next Fall by Michael Paulson

The theatrical concert has been a critical and commercial success. A film version by Spike Lee is also on the way.

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Review: ‘Happy Birthday Doug.’ Here’s a Vodka Stinger. by Elisabeth Vincentelli

Drew Droege’s solo show is a laugh-out-loud funny social sendup, but it doesn’t add up to more than a series of vignettes.

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‘TJ Loves Sally 4 Ever’ Review: It’s No Valentine by Laura Collins-Hughes

James Ijames’s satire reconsiders a story that reaches back to our shared past, with an eye toward demolishing it in favor of a better future.

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Friday, February 14, 2020

‘Fragments’ Review: Guest Lectures from a Famed Professor by Alexis Soloski

Berkeley’s Judith Butler is the star attraction in a stimulating if overlong performance piece by her fellow academic Alexandra Chasin.

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Thursday, February 13, 2020

A Beloved Neighbor Leaves the Building by Peter Khoury

An Illinois farm boy who came to New York to be a singer left an indelible mark on the Upper West Side co-op where he lived for more than six decades.

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Review: A Long Night as Tony Kushner Revisits ‘The Visit’ by Ben Brantley

This murky and tedious reworking of Friedrich Dürrenmatt’s dark fable of love and lucre is illuminated by Lesley Manville’s dazzling star turn.

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‘Unmasked’ Review: Andrew Lloyd Webber Reveals and Remembers by Laura Collins-Hughes

This multimedia concert and career retrospective forgets that the best way to honor the composer is to have a good time with his music.

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Renewing the World (or the Theater, at Least) by A.j. Goldmann

An avant-garde Berlin director has sold out a 2,000-seat venue that usually draws crowds with death-defying acrobatics or rousing musical numbers.

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Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Review: In ‘Leopoldstadt,’ Tom Stoppard Reckons With His Jewish Roots by Ben Brantley

In what he says will probably be his last work, a master playwright finds urgent lessons for the present in the past of a Viennese family.

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Paula Kelly, Who Danced From Stage Onto the Screen, Dies at 77 by Katharine Q. Seelye

She was one of the first black women to make the transition, propelled by the musical “Sweet Charity.” She also broke ground playing a black lesbian on TV.

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‘House Plant’ Review: A Bizarro Breakup and What Comes After by Laura Collins-Hughes

In Sarah Einspanier’s fever-dream play, one half of a couple heads to Hollywood. The other gets an odd, and oddly familiar, new roommate.

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Lip-Syncing Her Abduction, Matter-of-Factly by Laura Collins-Hughes

Deirdre O’Connell has a peculiar challenge performing the recollections of Lucas Hnath's mother in his play “Dana H.” Give credit to earbuds and Epsom salts.

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Lauren Graham’s Week: Background Binges and Books, Books, Books

The former “Gilmore Girls” star and best-selling author shares what she watched, read and listened to in a week.

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Review: Chekhov and Tolstoy Reunited in ‘Love Stories’ by Alexis Soloski

The Mint Theater Company pairs stage adaptations of short stories by the 19th-century Russian authors. They mesh like mismatched matryoshka dolls.

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Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Charles Fuller Never Expected Broadway. At 80, He’s Arrived. by Salamishah Tillet

The creator of “A Soldier’s Play” has largely written for black theaters. But now he has the chance to remind the biggest audiences: African-Americans served, too.

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All that Chat

2019-2020 BROADWAY SEASON
Oct 06: Slave Play
Feb 01: The Minutes
TBA: Blue