Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Critic’s Pick: Review: In ‘Ink,’ a Mephistopheles Named Murdoch Takes Charge by Ben Brantley

James Graham’s invigorating play about London journalism goes on a journey to the tabloid underworld — and the American present.

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Mark Medoff, ‘Children of a Lesser God’ Playwright, Dies at 79 by Neil Genzlinger

The work, featuring a central character who is deaf, won the Tony Award for best play in 1980 and was turned into an Oscar-winning 1986 movie.

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A Set as ‘Intense’ as the Stories the ‘Constitution’ Tells by Rob Weinert-Kendt

It was one thing to deliver lectures in American Legion halls as a teenager. It’s another to stand on a Broadway stage flanked by the photos of 163 staring men.

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Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Critic’s Pick: Review: ‘Tootsie,’ a Musical Comedy That Fills Some Mighty Big Heels by Jesse Green

The Broadway adaptation of the 1982 movie is the rare reimagining that actually keeps you laughing.

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Michael Jackson Biographers Face History, and the Mirror by Reggie Ugwu

After child molestation accusations of “Leaving Neverland,” books about the pop icon are already being rewritten. Who will have the last word?

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Michael Jackson Musical Creators: ‘We’re Not Judge and Jury’ by Michael Paulson

The playwright Lynn Nottage and the director-choreographer Christopher Wheeldon remain committed to the show, even after a damning documentary.

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Monday, April 22, 2019

Review: Arthur Miller’s ‘All My Sons,’ With All Its Seams Showing by Jesse Green

An old-fashioned, overliteral revival of the 1947 play stars Tracy Letts and Annette Bening.

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Review: Love Bites, Hard, in ‘The Pain of My Belligerence’ by Ben Brantley

Halley Feiffer stars opposite Hamish Linklater in her new comedy of anguish, which begins with a memorably chilling first date.

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Sunday, April 21, 2019

Critic’s Pick: Review: Taylor Mac’s ‘Gary’ Finds Hope and Humor on a Pile of Corpses by Jesse Green

This comedic sequel to “Titus Andronicus” finds Nathan Lane and Kristine Nielsen cleaning up after a Shakespearean blood bath.

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Critic’s Pick: Review: In ‘The Appointment,’ the Fetus Sings Out by Ben Brantley

This uncanny, phantasmagorical work from the Lightning Rod Special troupe is a musical cabaret about abortion. That’s right.

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Thursday, April 18, 2019

Critic’s Pick: Review: In ‘Hillary and Clinton,’ Codependence, and, Yes, Camaraderie by Ben Brantley

As a born-to-lose presidential contender, Laurie Metcalf is exasperation incarnate in Lucas Hnath’s play, which also stars John Lithgow.

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Jake Gyllenhaal and Tom Sturridge to Perform ‘Sea Wall/A Life’ on Broadway by Michael Paulson

The two monologues, which the actors performed last winter Off Broadway at the Public Theater, were written by Simon Stephens and Nick Payne.

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Kerry Washington, Nathan Lane and Others Read Plays About Our Future

We asked 15 playwrights to create original works around their visions of America in 2024. Six of them were read onscreen.

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Review: An Actor’s Life Story Grounds ‘Jack &’ With ‘The Cotillion’ by Elisabeth Vincentelli

Kaneza Schaal’s experimental theater work has three sections and is paired with an installation featuring paintings and videos of the show’s inspirations.

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Big City: ‘The Lehman Trilogy’ and the Theater of the Absurdly Rich by Ginia Bellafante

When the evening’s entertainment harshly criticizes capitalism — at $2,000 a seat.

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‘Stuck’ Review: A Movie Musical Set in a Subway Car? Stand Clear. by Glenn Kenny

Michael Berry’s film about characters on a stalled train aims to show how, yes, we’re all connected and yes, we all need one another.

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In John Cameron Mitchell’s Podcast, a Rock Musical That’s All in Your Head by Alexis Soloski

“Anthem: Homunculus” is a six-hour, 10-episode epic about a man and his teratoma. The tumor sings. As do Glenn Close, Patti LuPone and Cynthia Erivo.

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London Theater Reviews: On the London Stage, ‘Top Girls’ and a Grande Dame by Matt Wolf

Maggie Smith tackles an impressive one-woman show at the Bridge Theater, and a British classic of the 1980s gets a new lease on life at the National.

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Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Critic’s Pick: Review: The Metamorphosis of ‘Hadestown,’ From Cool to Gorgeous by Jesse Green

After a downtown stop, a concept album based on Greek myths has become a full-scale Broadway entertainment.

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San Francisco’s Big-Hatted ‘Beach Blanket Babylon’ to Close after 45 Years by Michael Paulson

This treasured San Francisco staple is renowned as much for its spectacularly sculptural headgear as its content.

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Review: In ‘All Our Children,’ Moral Authority Wades Into Nazi Germany by Laura Collins-Hughes

Stephen Unwin’s play, set in Germany in 1941, explores the reluctant evil perpetrated by people who think of themselves as good.

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Can a Greek Tragedy Help Heal a Scarred City? by Alissa J. Rubin

On the ground with the provocative stage director Milo Rau, who brought together European and Iraqi actors for a take on “The Oresteia” set in Mosul.

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Lehman Brothers, a Family Saga, as Viewed by Some Who Lived It by Patricia Cohen

“The Lehman Trilogy” is a theatrical panorama of the firm’s history and collapse. Lehman descendants and onetime employees have taken a keen interest.

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Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Review: Adam Driver Heats Up a Wobbly ‘Burn This’ by Ben Brantley

In this imbalanced revival of Lanford Wilson’s play, also starring Keri Russell, Mr. Driver unleashes the full, scorching power of his talent.

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Review: In ‘Socrates,’ a Brainy Tribute to a Prickly Provocateur by Laura Collins-Hughes

Michael Stuhlbarg is sublime in the title role of Tim Blake Nelson’s admiring but overlong play, presented as part of the Onassis Festival.

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Playwrights Horizons Announces New Season by Gabrielle Debinski

Michael Friedman’s “Unknown Soldier” will be staged in the 2019-20 season, along with plays by Jeremy O. Harris and Lucas Hnath.

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A Dark ‘Oklahoma!’ Brings Barefoot Modern Dance to Broadway by Gia Kourlas

The choreographer John Heginbotham and the director Daniel Fish want the dance to “change the way we experience the show.”

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Monday, April 15, 2019

Review: In ‘17 Border Crossings,’ Some Areas Are Left Unexplored by Elisabeth Vincentelli

Thaddeus Phillips’s genial show retreats every time things get sticky or uncomfortable.

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Georgia Engel, Gentle-Voiced ‘Mary Tyler Moore’ Actress, Is Dead at 70 by Neil Genzlinger

After gaining fame as the blustery newsman Ted Baxter’s love interest, Ms. Engel went on to “Everybody Loves Raymond” and more.

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Critic’s Notebook: Toxic Men Get All the Attention. But Not in These Plays. by Laura Collins-Hughes

The perspectives of women are welcome in an art form that inherently fosters empathy — and in which it matters greatly whom we’re asked to feel for.

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Rattlestick Theater Festival to Commemorate Stonewall Anniversary by Lauren Messman

The Pride Plays festival will feature more than a dozen readings from plays by seminal L.G.B.T. writers, as well as by newcomers.

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