Friday, July 20, 2018

Taylor Swift and Jennifer Hudson to Star in ‘Cats’ Movie Adaptation by Aisha Harris

James Corden and Ian McKellen will also be a part of the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical, directed by Tom Hooper.

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A Buoyant ’70s Musical About Black Lives Lands in 2018 by Eric Grode

The creators of “Don’t Bother Me, I Can’t Cope” took their bighearted revue all the way to Broadway. A concert production will show how it plays today.

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This Week in the Arts: Panorama, Andrew Solomon, ‘Be More Chill’ by The New York Times

The Weeknd headlines the New York festival, “Far From the Tree” comes to screens and the high school musical debuts on Off Broadway.

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Thursday, July 19, 2018

Lin-Manuel Miranda to Direct Film Adaptation of ‘Tick, Tick … Boom!’ by Sopan Deb

The force behind “Hamilton” and “In the Heights” will bring his vision to the big screen for the first time with an adaptation of a musical by the “Rent” creator Jonathan Larson.

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Comics of Asian Descent, Tired of Being Invisible, Put Themselves Onstage by Kasia Pilat

Despite regularly selling out U.C.B. theaters, the series founder says success would mean such a diverse comedy scene that the show wasn’t needed.

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Review: Taming ‘The Taming of the Shrew’ Under a Tent by Jesse Green

An hour north of New York City, a new production of Shakespeare’s impossible comedy finds a sensible way to respond to the #MeToo moment.

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At Avignon Festival, Lots of Imagination on Show, but Few Women by Laura Cappelle

Despite some eye-catching dramatics, the paucity of female directors and protagonists at the most important event in the French theater calendar sticks out.

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Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Gary Beach, Tony Winner for ‘The Producers,’ Dies at 70 by Neil Genzlinger

Mr. Beach’s many Broadway roles also included Lumière, the genial candelabra, in the original cast of “Beauty and the Beast.”

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Brantley in Britain: Review: Song Trumps Senility in the Angry ‘Allelujah!’ by Ben Brantley

This comedy of dismay by Alan Bennett, author of “The History Boys,” portrays a geriatric ward (of singing, dancing patients!) in an uncaring Britain.

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Abrons Arts Center to Celebrate a Milestone With Political Work by Peter Libbey

Craig Peterson, the artistic director of the center, says the new season will focus how local issues on the Lower East Side mirror national concerns.

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Review: In ‘The Damned,’ Ivo van Hove Finds the Mortal Chill in a Nazi Fire by Ben Brantley

The Comédie-Française’s mesmerizing adaptation of Luchino Visconti’s film charts the fall of a family steel dynasty during Hitler’s rise to power.

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Review: At Stratford, ‘Coriolanus’ Is Riveting and Troubling by Jesse Green

The director Robert Lepage, recently criticized for cultural appropriation, finds in Shakespeare’s tragedy a defense of Great Man prerogatives.

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Bruce Springsteen’s Broadway Show Is Becoming a Netflix Special by Michael Paulson

The recording of “Springsteen on Broadway” will air on Dec. 15, the day of its final live performance.

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The Gritty Club at the Heart of ‘This Ain’t No Disco’ by Jim Farber

A new rock opera explores the New York club scene in 1979, with special attention to the Mudd Club, a punk-rock dive in TriBeCa.

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Feature: Young Jean Lee’s Unsafe Spaces by Parul Sehgal

The first female Asian-American playwright on Broadway takes aim at identity and watches the audience squirm.

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Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Review: ‘Blindspotting’ Walks a Tense Line in a Gentrifying Oakland by Glenn Kenny

Written by and starring Daveed Diggs and Rafael Casal, the film struggles to balance its ambition as an entertainment with its social concerns.

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Review: A Yiddish ‘Fiddler on the Roof’? Sounds Crazy, Nu? by Jesse Green

A powerful new revival of the 1964 musical offers a kind of authenticity no other American “Fiddler” ever has: It’s in Yiddish.

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The Upcoming Flea Season Will Explore Police Brutality and Gun Violence by Andrew R. Chow

Productions include the filmmaker Todd Solondz’s first play, “Emma and Max,” and Thomas Bradshaw’s incendiary “Southern Promises.”

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‘School of Rock’ Announces Closing Date by Michael Paulson

The Andrew Lloyd Webber musical will have played more than 1,300 performances when it wraps up in January.

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Monday, July 16, 2018

Review: ‘Fire in Dreamland’ Is a Parable of Love and Licorice by Alexis Soloski

Rinne Groff’s new play, at the Public Theater, brings arguments about art and relationships to Coney Island in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.

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A Show About Indigenous Canadians Has a Glaring Omission: Indigenous Canadian Actors by Dan Bilefsky

An outcry over Robert Lepage’s “Kanata” follows protests that shut down his show about slaves, which used a mostly white cast.

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Sunday, July 15, 2018

Review: ‘Trainspotting Live’ Has (Gross) Humor but Not Enough Heart by Laura Collins-Hughes

This immersive British import at Roy Arias Stages puts a crusty toilet in the center of the audience, but it lacks the film version’s sense of seamy tragedy.

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Review: A Stranger, Sexier Version of ‘Peter Pan’? It’s Leonard Bernstein’s. by Alexis Soloski

In this production of J.M. Barrie’s 1904 play, Bernstein’s neglected score brings out the characters’ melancholic desires.

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Review: In ‘Marie and Bruce,’ It Takes Two to Do This Nihilistic Tango by Elisabeth Vincentelli

In this revival of Wallace Shawn’s 1979 play, a couple’s loathing creates a weird frisson of erotic challenge.

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Trump Has Yet to Award the National Arts Medals for 2016 by Peter Libbey

Other presidents have dawdled, too, but President Trump is the first to go this long without awarding national medals in the arts and humanities.

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Friday, July 13, 2018

Critic’s Notebook: The Trouble With Bernstein’s Broadway in the Concert Hall by Joshua Barone

Recent concert stagings of “West Side Story” and “On the Town” show the pitfalls — and solutions — for symphonic performances of these musicals.

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Brantley in Britain: Review: ‘The Lehman Trilogy’ Is a Transfixing Epic of Riches and Ruin by Ben Brantley

In the National Theater’s adaptation of Stefano Massini’s play, three wondrous actors become multitudes.

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This Week in Arts: ‘Spike Jonze Is a Dancer,’ Robin Williams by The New York Times

The Dance on Camera Festival comes to Lincoln Center, and the Robin Williams documentary debuts on HBO.

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I Love Performing Those Songs. But What About the Gender Politics? by Melissa Errico

Melissa Errico, who is currently starring in “On a Clear Day You Can See Forever,” reflects on problematic female characters of Broadway’s golden age.

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In Conservative Munich, a Theater Turns Radical and Defends Refugees by A.j. Goldmann

Two plays at one of the city’s most important theaters make the case for accepting displaced people, as politics there is turning against them.

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Thursday, July 12, 2018

Review: ‘Mary Page Marlowe’ Lives an Ordinary, Extraordinary Life by Jesse Green

In Tracy Letts’s gripping play, it takes six actors (and a doll) to embody one steely, difficult woman, from infancy to the age of 69.

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